User Tools

Site Tools


1st_connecticut_cavalry

The 1st Connecticut Cavalry in Howard County

Service at Annapolis Junction 3/8/1864-3/15/1864.

Primary Sources
Archival and Secondary Sources

“The State's first cavalry regiment was organized as a battalion under Mjr. J.W. Lyon in Sept. 1861. It became a full regiment under Col. Wm. S. Fish in November and was fighting bushwackers in western Virginia in March, 1862. The 1st served with Gen. Sheridan in Wilson's Brigade and later in Custer's Brigade.

In the winter of 1862-1863 the regiment moved to Baltimore, Md. to be reorganized and was serving there during the Gettysburg Campaign. It moved to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., July 5, 1863, and did duty skirmishing with the southern cavalry in that vicinity until January, 1864. Col. Erastus Blakeslee became the regimental commander. The regiment served in Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign form August to December. It fought at Cedar Creek, Reams's Station, Five Forks, Yellow Tavern, and Sailor's Creek. It was the 1st CT that escorted Gen. Grant to receive Lee's surrender at Appomatox. The 1st suffered 772 casualties during the war. This was 56% of its strength attesting to its active campaigning.

The regiment lost during active service 4 Officers and 36 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, and 4 Officers and 149 Enlisted men by disease. A total of 193 lost their lives to all causes.” - http://www.civil-war-history.com/photo2.html

THE MILITARY AND CIVIL HISTORY OF CONNECTICUT DURING THE WAR OF 1861-65. W. A. CROFFUT AND JOHN M. MORRIS. LEDYARD BILL, 1868

“CHAPTER XXX. 00004570 THE MILITARY AND CIVIL HISTORY OF CONNECTICUT DURING THE WAR OF 1861-65. W. A. CROFFUT AND JOHN M. MORRIS. LEDYARD BILL, 1868, pp. 489-503.

“Orders were received to join the Army of the Potomac; and at eight o’clock, a.m., of March 8, the old camp was broken up and abandoned, rations cooked and distributed, horses fed and groomed, small packs made up; and six hundred and seventy-five mounted men were drawn up, mounted in close column of squadrons, every man in place, sabres shining, flags flying, and guidons flashing in the wind, —a magnificent array. Major Blakeslee, young and almost beardless, might well be proud of his command as the bugler sounded the officers’ call. The line-officers rode to the front, and received directions to permit no straggling nor foraging, and to keep the ranks well filled up. The bugler sounded the “Forward!” and away they rode to a year of deadly conflict, to toil and vigilance, heat, cold, and hunger, death-wounds and glory.

They went past the Relay House, and arrived at Annapolis Junction in the rain about three o’clock, p.m. Camp by squadrons was made east of the hospital. The officers fared well enough in the hospital; but the men had the wettest, muddiest, dismalest night they had spent since Wheeling Island and Moorefield. They were drenched, and lying in mud knee-deep. Two days later, they found a better camp, on a slope in a grove, where they were comfortable once more on dry land.”

1st_connecticut_cavalry.txt · Last modified: 2019/06/21 10:22 by admin